Tools required for garden maintenance

Twenty years ago I decided to start a garden maintenance company. I was fresh out of university, and had worked at low-paying jobs in garden centres, seed companies, and landscaping and garden maintenance companies.  I had very little money to buy garden equipment, so could buy only the most essential equipment.

Corona secateurs

Corona secateurs, one of the 11 essential gardening maintenance tools.

Mowing lawns was out of the question. The equipment was expensive and the competition fierce. Anyone can mow a lawn. But, perennial, annual and shrub maintenance — that was a totally different ball game. The equipment expense was minimal and the knowledge and experience requirement weeded out the competition.

Tools required for garden maintenance

My essential garden maintenance tool kit,  which fit easily into a large duffle bag, included:

  1. Hand trowel
  2. Hand cultivator
  3. Fan rake (folding)
  4. Shovel (folding)
  5. Secateurs
  6. Loppers
  7. Hedge shears
  8. Saw (folding)
  9. Tarp
  10. Collapsible garden waste container
  11. Kneeling pad

 

Digging and Planting

Planting or transplanting annuals, perennials and shrubs was easily done with a hand trowel and/or shovel.

 

Cultivating/weeding/deadheading

For weed control I used a combination of a hand cultivator and a hand trowel. Weeds were collected in collapsible garden waste containers. You can get away without a kneeling pad if your garden is small, but if you garden more than 2 hours a day, a kneeling pad is an absolute must. Your knees will thank you.

Snipping spent blooms is quickly and easily done with secateurs. Antiseptic alcohol cleans up the built-up gum and sterilizes the blades.

 

Cleaning

I collected landscape debris (i.e. leaves) with a fan rake and placed it in collapsible garden waste containers. All my gardening sites had a compost area.

Trimming

Hedge shears were a breeze to use on the larger hedges. However, I used the smaller secateurs to trim small topiaries. I collected the leaves in a tarp.

 

Pruning

With secateurs, saw and loppers, I was able to prune almost everything. I sterilized blades with alcohol between plants.

And don’t forget the essential personal attire:

  1. Durable flexible Gloves
  2. Sturdy shoes
  3. Wide brimmed, stay-on hat

 

I didn’t skimp on gloves. With my hands constantly in the dirt, it was essential to have durable, hardwearing, flexible, washable gloves. I settled on leather gloves that usually lasted me a couple seasons.

 

Sturdy shoes are a must. You don’t know what you will step on or brush past: thorns, glass, nettle, insects…

 

A large brimmed hat. Well, large enough to cover your face, but not get in the way when you are gardening. And a must: the hat needs to stay on regardless what you do or what the weather conditions.

Writing about my humble beginnings in the garden maintenance business inspires me. Next time I find myself stuck or being negative, I will remind myself I have a “can do” attitude. I just have to dig down for it.

 


Written by Cristina da Silva
Wednesday, February 20, 2013 in Landscaping & Soil

Social Sharing Share 'Tools required for garden maintenance' on Delicious Share 'Tools required for garden maintenance' on Digg Share 'Tools required for garden maintenance' on Facebook Share 'Tools required for garden maintenance' on Google+ Share 'Tools required for garden maintenance' on LinkedIn Share 'Tools required for garden maintenance' on Pinterest Share 'Tools required for garden maintenance' on reddit Share 'Tools required for garden maintenance' on StumbleUpon Share 'Tools required for garden maintenance' on Twitter Share 'Tools required for garden maintenance' on Add to Bookmarks Share 'Tools required for garden maintenance' on Email Share 'Tools required for garden maintenance' on Print Friendly

Comments

  1. Good tips, Cristina. I especially like the folding gear idea.

  2. Great post and insight on essential tools for garden maintenance. I’m also impressed that you wipe down your pruning tools with alcohol wipes after use. It’s a smart idea to keep the blades free of sap and debris to help maintain cutting performance, as well as sterilized. It’s an important task that many gardeners overlook.

    Thank you for sharing and I thoroughly enjoyed reading about your humble garden beginnings. Not to mention your excellent choice in secateurs!

  3. Thank you for your comments, Chris! You would know…you are the voice of Corona Tools!


Leave a Reply to Helen at Toronto Gardens Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *